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NEW ENGLAND CRANE SCHOOL
New England Crane School Newsletter Header image
Spring 2019
 
Crane Operator State Licensing vs. OSHA’s Federal Certification Requirement

By Anna DeBattiste

If you’re confused about state vs. federal compliance requirements, you’re not alone. We too wish that states would get on the same page with OSHA and make things simpler, but wishing will not make it so. Here is what you need to know.

First of all, the OSHA requirement for a nationally accredited certification applies to everyone, regardless of what state you work in, unless:

  • You work in a state with a licensing program that meets the “federal floor,” and you work ONLY in that state. Around these parts (New England and New York) that means Connecticut, and Connecticut only.
  • You are qualified by the military (but only as long as you remain in the military and are operating in that capacity).
  • You are qualified by an audited employer program, which is a fairly rare occurrence.

For everyone else, you must obtain a nationally accredited certification, which means a certification by NCCER, NCCCO or the Union of Operating Engineers.

Unfortunately, however, you may also have to satisfy state requirements depending on where you operate. Here is a breakdown of New England and New York state requirements:



New Hampshire
– No state licensing program, so all you need is a nationally accredited cert.



Massachusetts
– You must have a Mass Hoisting License to operate in that state, in addition to your nationally accredited cert.



Vermont
– No state licensing program, so all you need is a nationally accredited cert.


Rhode Island
– You must have a state-issued Hoisting Engineer’s License, in addition to your nationally accredited cert.



Maine
- No state licensing program, so all you need is a nationally accredited cert.



New York state
(not including NY city, which has different requirements) – You must have a state-issued Crane Operator’s Certificate of Competence, which you can only obtain after three years of practical experience. You must also have a nationally accredited cert.



Connecticut
– If you are operating a crane with a capacity of more than 5 tons, you must have a state-issued Crane Operator’s License, which you can obtain after a two-year apprenticeship. As mentioned above, once you have this it covers you for the federal OSHA requirement as long as you are only operating in CT. If you operate in other states, however, you must also have a nationally accredited cert. And if you operate only cranes with a capacity of 5 tons or less, your nationally accredited cert will cover you for the CT licensing requirement.



For more information on state licensing and to find links to state licensing websites and application forms, go to the Frequently Asked Questions tab on our website HERE, and scroll down to the bottom of the page.

 

 

 
 
 
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  New England Crane School
Public Class Schedule

April 29 – May 2, 2019

NCCER operator certification class, White River Junction, VT

 

May 7, 2019

Qualified Signal Person and Basic Rigging class, Manchester, NH

 

May 13 – 17, 2019

NCCCO operator certification class, Shawmut Equipment, South Easton, MA

 

June 24 – 27, 2019

NCCER operator certification class, Concord, NH

 

October 7 – 11, 2019

NCCCO operator certification class, Shawmut Equipment, South Easton, MA

 

 

For more information or to register, call Anna at 303-817-5663, email anna@newenglandcraneschool.com or visit www.newenglandcraneschool.com

 
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